Regearing to 4.56 Gears on the 5th Gen 4Runner

3000 Mile Review: 4.56 Gears by East Coast Gear Supply for the 5th Gen 4Runner

3000 Mile In-depth Review: Regearing to 4.56 Gears by East Coast Gear Supply On the 5th Gen 4Runner

3000 miles ago, I re-geared my 2016 4Runner to 4.56 Gears using East Coast Gear Supply’s Assembled 3rd Members.

I’ll talk about why I did it, the pros and cons and some of the technical details.

But first, let’s understand a little bit more about re-gearing like when it’s needed, why it’s done, and what it accomplishes.

The Set-Up

  • East Coast Gear Supply 3rds Members for 5th Gen 4Runner: Check Price

The Dilemma

3000 Mile Review: 4.56 Gears by East Coast Gear Supply for the 5th Gen 4Runner: The Dilemma

Let’s be honest, the stock 4400-lb 5th Gen 4Runner pushing out 270hp and 278 lb-ft torque was never zippy, to begin with. And, after all your mods and gear acquisitions, it now feels even slower than molasses.

So, let’s say you’ve lifted your truck 2 or 3 inches, added heavier oversized AT or mud tires…

Maybe you’ve even added some body armor, a metal bumper, winch, rear tire swing, an onboard fridge, a second battery, and/or a roof rack.  Your truck now looks like a beast on the road and it’s now a very capable machine in the off-road environment too!

But there’s a downside…

Your truck brick-in-the-wind is probably searching for gears on hill climbs or even while trying to cruise by slower traffic in the fast lane on a flat highway.

Your MPGs drop a bit as the engine is working harder to fully rotate those larger wheels, and your driving experience (although subjective) probably suffers a bit.

So, why is this happening?

Well, your truck might now be somewhere between 500-1500 pounds heavier when not under load and it now has considerably more frictional resistance and wind resistance to deal with when driving.

In technical terms, you’ve increased the mass of your vehicle and you now need more torque if you want your acceleration, shifting points, and power band to feel “normal” again.

Without getting overly technical, this dilemma occurs because the larger tires and added weight reduce the thrust that moves your truck forward.

In short, more torque is needed to get your oversized tires rotating and your vehicle to overcome the drag from the added weight and frictional/wind resistance.

Your truck hasn’t actually lost power, but it is definitely now working harder to turn those wheels!

As a result, your drivetrain and power band probably feel weaker and out of balance.  Transmission shifting points will feel out-of-whack too.

For some, that constant driving experience is a small price to pay and isn’t bothersome, for others it’s just unbearable.  I raised my hand to the latter of the two.

You, yourself, will probably compensate for the loss in torque by pressing the tall-skinny pedal a bit more.

Your truck will try to compensate at times by downshifting and “searching for gears” to provide more torque to the wheels as well.

At the end of the day, unless you restore the torque that was lost due to larger tires and added weight, your truck (depending on your specific set up) will constantly feel sluggish and underpowered and even more-so when under-load.

If you enjoy technical reading, math formulas, Newton’s laws, and would like to understand crawl ratio, torque, gearing, and all the science behind it much more in-depth, I highly suggest this article by Jalopnik—Crawl Ratios and Off-Road Gearing

Now we get it… So, Let’s Take a Look at the Solutions

The Potential Solutions

3000 Mile Review: 4.56 Gears by East Coast Gear Supply for the 5th Gen 4Runner: The Solution

If you find yourself in the middle of this dilemma, there’s a handful of small to medium performance mods you can do.

Said mods have pretty minimal “gains” in the HP and torque areas but are still worth considering.

To find out more you can read our full round-up on 5th Gen 4Runner performance mods.

For the potential solutions…

Performance mods and upgrades like CAI, Catback exhaust, and headers may help a little.

However, there are really only two feasible options that instantly re-balance your power band, restore torque back to the wheels, and bring the shifting points back to normal.

Your Two Options:  Supercharge or Re-Gear

Both options provide more torque to the wheels, but in different ways:

  • Supercharger basically increases your engine’s actual HP/torque output.
  • Re-gearing increases torque by allowing the engine’s available power to transfer and rotate the wheels more easily.

Take, for example, the need to un-tighten a nut that is stuck on a bolt.  You can either push harder on the wrench or use a longer wrench to turn the nut “easier.”

Adding a supercharger to your truck would be equivalent to adding an extra set of hands to physically push harder on your wrench to get the bolt to finally come loose.

Re-gearing your truck would be like switching to longer wrench and using leverage to get it loose.

With the latter option, you use the same amount of “muscle” originally used… But we all know that the longer the wrench handle, the “easier” it is to turn and loosen the bolt due to the laws of leverage.

I, personally, already have the Magnuson Supercharger installed on my 4Runner, but I still also choose to re-gear to 4.56 and I’ll be reviewing this decision further below.

A NOTE ON THE SUPERCHARGER:  We aren’t going to cover the Supercharger option here, but we do have a great article that compares Supercharging and Re-Gearing… and you can read our full detailed review of the Magnuson Supercharger as well.

Now back to re-gearing…

Gears 101

East Coast Gear Supply 4.56 Gears, 3000 Mile Review: Gears 101

If you have no clue what gears actually are or how they work, the easiest and most familiar way to understand gears is thinking about a road bike or a mountain bike.

The gears on a bicycle are the clusters of spiky circular rings around the pedals and at the rear wheel which the bike chain wraps around.

Gears are necessary for the process of transferring power from the power source down to the movable object (in this case, the bike wheels).

If you’ve ever ridden a road bike or mountain bike, you will know that its “easier” to accelerate and/or climb inclines when you switch the bike chain to the largest gears.  The larger gears are creating more torque since they are letting your legs turn higher RPMs at slower moving speeds when there is a lot of net force against you.

Conceptually speaking, gears in cars work just about the same way.

Why re-gear to 4.56 or 4.88?

I think it’s safe to assume that most of you reading this have already added weight and larger tires to your 4Runner.  If you haven’t already, you’re probably planning on doing so sooner rather than later!

A stock 5th Gen 4Runner’s power band was geared for a 4400 lb truck needing to turn 31” tires… It wasn’t geared for a 5800 lb truck turning 33”, 34”, or 35” tires.

A stock 5th Gen 4Runner is geared with 3.73 gears.

Proper re-gearing will reset your drivetrain to efficiently deliver the extra torque needed to the wheels on your heavier 4Runner with oversized tires.  Re-gearing allows your engine to work a little easier and efficiently turning those wheels especially during acceleration or while under load.

Long term, re-gearing should reduce the amount of stress on the drivetrain and hopefully prevent extra wear, tear, and breakage on heavier modified 4Runners.

Also, if you own a 4Runner and you are a bit of a speed junkie, I will say I cannot help you. You may have bought the wrong vehicle, to begin with… 🙂

However, the fact is, re-gearing will absolutely improve your truck’s acceleration and zippy-ness.

But you have a supercharger, why did YOU re-gear?

Fair question and there are a few reasons…

First and foremost, I’m self-admittedly a bit of a speed junkie.

Coming from a previous 5.7L V8 daily driver, the 4Runner wasn’t just a step down in power and acceleration, it was practically a fall off a cliff.  I decided early on I wanted to do all the major upgrades to retain a much power and acceleration possible on the 5th Gen 4Runner.

Practically speaking, there are a few other reasons I decided to re-gear:

  1. Low current mileage – at only 30k miles, both, my drivetrain and I,  are going to enjoy this investment for a verrry long time.
  2. Tire size – I’m on 33” tires, and will likely upgrade to 34” tires next time I need a set.
  3. More weight coming soon – Metal bumper, sliders, and winch are going to be my next mods
  4. Load Weight – I carry a lot of extra weight when camping… for example, I move a family of 5, I carry an extra 8 gallons of premium gas for the Magnuson, onboard refrigerator, enough supplies for a family of 5, etc. It all adds up very very quickly to approximately a 6000lb curb weight.
  5. Other’s Experience – Every single person that’s re-geared has said how much they love it.

Why I Chose East Coast Gear Supply

East Coast Gear Supply 4.56 Gears, 3000 Mile Review: Why I chose East Coast Gear Supply

I choose East Coat Gear Supply due to convenience and reputation.

With East Coast Gear supply, you actually buy a pair of Assembled 3rd members with the gear size of your choice.  Additional options for the Toyota e-locker are available.

If you don’t have the stock Toyota e-locker, then that’s fine.

You can pay extra to have ECGS add an aftermarket e-locker or air locker of your choice.  You always have the option to just go with no lockers as well.

I found it a lot easier to call and place my order with an ECGS rep over the phone.

Lead times are 3-5 weeks, so you want to make sure you get your order 100% correct the first time and I found that placing an order on the phone was super easy and quick.

ECGS Sales Reps are extremely kind and knowledgeable and the whole process took about 5 minutes.

Once the order is ready-ready, ECGS ships you a pair of 3rd Members.

After your installation is complete, you ship back your old 3rd members to ECGS.  There is a core charge which is refunded once ECGS receive your old 3rd members safe and sound.

What happens after re-gearing?

Practically speaking, the most observable differences you will experience after a re-gear are exactly what you’d imagine.

Improved acceleration, improved fuel economy (especially “city mpg”), and your shifting points should feel normal again as if you were driving a stock 4400lb 4Runner right off the lot.

You will certainly notice higher RPMs, especially at cruising speeds. 

After switching to 4.56s,  I cruise at 70mph and doing about 2400RPMs on 33” tires.  BEFORE switching to 4.56s,  I was doing 70mph at about 2000 RPMs also on 33” tires.

The higher RPMs are due to your driveshaft having to make more actual turns to rotate your tire one full rotation.

On 4.56s the wheels turn “easier” but it takes almost one full extra rotation of the driveshaft to actually turn the tires 1 full rotation compared to the stock 3.73 gears.

Non-observable differences are mainly that your engine isn’t working quite as hard to turn the wheels in most circumstances.

Off-Road Performance after Re-Gearing

East Coast Gear Supply 4.56 Gears, 3000 Mile Review: Off Road Performance after Re-Gearing

This is one area where re-gearing really shines!

When on the trail, your 4.56 gears are going to give you a great improvement in performance.

The 4.56s create a better crawl ratio which in Layman’s terms essentially means the added torque of your new gears translates into traversing obstacles more slowly and with more control.

With 4.56 gears, your engine can now rev higher keeping its power up even while at slower speeds which means you ought to experience way more throttle control off-roading.

When you do apply gas, your truck won’t immediately jerks forward (at least not very far) and the new gears will reduce any lurching you may have experienced in the past while trying to get over obstacles.

Hill descents will be a bit slower and controlled when holding it in 1st gear as well.

Let’s review the Pros & Cons…

Pros of Re-Gearing:

  • Better Off-Road Control and Performance
  • Quicker overall Acceleration
  • Shifting Points return to normal
  • The truck will feel lighter/faster
  • Better Crawl Ratio on trails
  • Likely improvement in Fuel Economy
  • No more searching for gears
  • Less Stress on the Drivetrain long-term

Cons of Re-Gearing:

  • Higher RPMs at cruising speeds on 33” Tires
  • Expensive Modification
  • Equally expensive to reverse the mod

It’s been 3000 miles… so was it worth the cost?

East Coast Gear Supply 4.56 Gears, 3000 Mile Review: It’s been 3000 miles… so was it worth it?

Depending on what labor rate you get for installation, the full job using ECGS 3rd members probably will cost around $2300-$2800 (without having ECGS add lockers) with an experienced shop that knows what they are doing.

After 3000 miles of use, I will say that the re-gear has absolutely been worth it.  It is a pretty expensive modification…

Comparable in price with a good quality full-suspension upgrade, however, a re-gear is only about 1/3 of the price of the Magnuson Supercharger option.

For me, my truck’s low mileage was a big factor when considering investing a re-gear upgrade.

At just about 30k miles on the odometer, I will be able to enjoy the investment of this 4.56 gear upgrade for a very very long time to come, perhaps 250k or more miles on this vehicle!

Performance-wise, acceleration is better and the truck feels lighter!

You will absolutely notice the improvement in acceleration after the re-gear.

My 4Runner sits on 285/70/17 tires, full skid package, full-size Frontrunner Roof Rack, about a 2.5” lift… and the truck feels lighter and zippier than ever.

Granted I do have the Magnuson Supercharger installed, but the truck feels even lighter and it is faster even after the re-gear.

Regarding fuel economy, I happened to add a full RCI aluminum skid package to the underside at the same time that I re-geared so more added weight.

I also do a lot of highway miles at 70-75mph which is where you see the fuel economy gains of the 4.56s hit diminishing returns.

So for me, my fuel economy for me after 3000 miles actually didn’t actually change very much. It’s important to note that your experience with fuel economy will vary based on the specs of your rig and your driving habits.

The Magnuson Supercharger also takes a little bit of a hit on my fuel economy since the PSI boost is now almost always kicked-in, even at highway speeds due to the higher RPMs.

For those interested, with the Magnuson, 285s (approx 33”) tires, full Front Runner roof rack, RCI Skids, and 4.56 gears, my dash computer reads out 13.4mpg after 3k miles with the 4.56s.

I reset the MPG reading the day I got the 4.56s installed, so this is a 3000 mile reading with one 2-day off-roading trip in the midst of that 3000 miles.

90% of my driving or more has been highway mileage between 65-75mph.

The Verdict on RPMs

East Coast Gear Supply 4.56 Gears, 3000 Mile Review: The Final Verdict

[LEFT: Stock 3.73 Gears, 1600 RPMs at 60mph, RIGHT: 4.56 Gears, 2000 RPMs at 60mph]

When cruising on the highways, the engine is usually turning about 2400-2600 RPMs…

At 60mph, the engine turns about 2000 RPMs. At 70mph, it turns about 2400RPMs at 75mph; it’s a bit closer to 2500 RPMs depending on wind and incline.

I knew the RPMs would be higher, but in real life, the “feel” of constantly higher RPMs was a bit of a shocker and took some getting used to.

With stock gears and the Magnuson SC, my cruising RPMs used to sit between 1900-2000 at 70-75mph.

However, cruising at 2400-3000 RPMs is really not stressing anything out even though you may not be used to it mentally.

Final Thoughts & Overview

One of the final reasons I decided to re-gear had to do with the possibility of increasing my tire size from 33” to 34” tires.

Making that tire size increase again adds to the amount of torque needed for the truck to operate efficiently and properly. And the 4.56 gears are capable of keeping that powertrain right where it needs to be with tires up to 34” in size.

I will be adding more weight soon too via metal bumper, winch, and rock sliders.

Some research indicates that 4.56 gears are even good-to-go for tire sizes all the way up to 35.”

There is a little bit of relativity because vehicle mass should also be accounted for too.  A very heavy 4Runner on 35” tires may be better off with 4.88 gears, but for the most part the overall consensus is that 4.56 gears are the proper for “built-out” 4Runners with tire sizes of 33” to 35”

All in all, I’m happy with this modification and would recommend it for anyone that wants to restore the balance of your power band and alleviate the sluggishness of a heavy 4Runner on oversized tires.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

37 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Vincent Renda
Vincent Renda
2 months ago

Great article. Thank you.

Ron
Ron
9 months ago

Stock tires are 265/70-17 which equates to 31.6″ which equates to what everyone refers to as a 32″ tire. Similar to a 34″ tire measuring roughly 33.5″ and a 35″ tire about 34.6ish. I understand for the sake of your article you want to talk about 31’s on the stock 4runner but they are actually 32’s.

Adriel Detablan
Adriel Detablan
11 months ago

Hey i just bought a 4.88 nitro gears do they only come with 1 ring and pinion gear?

Roc_n_loh
Roc_n_loh
1 year ago

Hey Steve! I appreciate your article for it helped me visualize what a regear would do for our cars. However, I am still undecided in terms of which gears to get.

My current set up – 2.5 kings w/ adjusters, 2.5in the front and 2in in the rear, 285 70r 17s tires, full size roof rack, 40in light bar, awning, fully loaded tire carrier (rotopax/maxtrax/285 tire), and ladder.

I plan on going 34’s or 35’s, adding a winch slimline bumper, rci full armor, auxilary tank and fridge in the cargo. After my 285’s have bottomed out which would probably be in a year.

I use my vehicle as my daily commuter, my commute consists of hills, and I also off road every 2-3 times a month off roading. I do not do any heavy rock crawling but do mild – moderate trails.

I don’t plan on doing a super charger because I just don’t want to deal with the maintenance that it comes with later on.

Would you still go 4.56 in this scenario or just go straight to 4.88? Please, let me know!
I know, you mentioned 4.56 would give better city mpg but would 4.88 also give a boost in the city mpg and slightly decrease on the highway or be completely different?

Please, let me know!

Last edited 1 year ago by Roc_n_loh
Ralph Swan
Ralph Swan
1 year ago

Going to be regearing, currently running 34s (with rack, skid plates, front bumper, OME suspension, and have a 1000lbs trailer). Have a 16’ trail with rear e-locker and plan to upgrade to front locker. Do you have a recommended brand for front e-locker?

Scott
Scott
1 year ago

Great article, which will be very helpful to me in deciding to re-gear. However, I’m either confused or mis-reading something. In the “before” and “after” pics of the tachometer and speedometer, it says the left picture is with the original 3.73 gears, and the right picture is with the new 4.56 gears, yet the odometer reading in the left “before” picture is a few thousand miles higher than in the right “after” picture. What am I missing here?

Trent
Trent
1 year ago
Reply to  Scott

One is Odometer and one is Trip A.

Vic
Vic
1 year ago

I wonder how different the results would be if this was re-gearing a 4th gen v8 with no supercharger

Rick
Rick
1 year ago

Really great article Steve! My question to you is, did I just hose myself by having ARB lockers installed prior to re-gearing? My 19’ 4RUNNER just had major upgrades to include a 4” Icon lift, ARB air lockers front and back, new sliders and 35” tires. I took it out after having the work done and got it “stuck” with the left side of the 4Runner stuck in mud and the right on dry ground. I did not have the torque to get out and the trans started to overheat. It is my thought that re-gearing will help this situation. Thoughts? Weight was down as I do not have the tent on and am waiting for my skid plates to arrive. I do have a Gobi rack, concealed front bumper with winch as well as the Rigd spare tire carrier in the rear.

Donald Wood
Donald Wood
1 year ago

How did you recalibrate the speedo? I’m honestly more worried about the odometer

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  Donald Wood

Hi Donald, this may be more than you asked for, but here’s the full breakdown. The speedometer will not be affected by changes in gear size because Speed is a distance/time equation calculated by a speed sensors in the wheels that measures how quickly you wheels are spinning. Larger gears only affect engine RMPs relative to wheel rotation, this change in engine RPMs has has other peripheral benefits in our drivelines thus making the re-gear a valuable mod. Our truck computers are programmed to calculate their speed based on the rate of wheel rotation relative to the distance a stock tire size travels.

Larger gears will require your engine to spin more RPMs to cover a given distance, therefore at 60mph on larger gears, your RPMs will be higher than at 60mph on stock gears. However again, the gear size wont affect your speedo.

Taking this a step further, introducing larger tires DOES affect speedometer calibration because introducing a larger tire like a 34″ or 35″ lets your truck cover a greater distance per each wheel revolution compared to 31″ diameter tires at the same wheel revolution. Larger tires change the distance variable in the Speed equation. On larger tires, your truck wheel needs less revolutions to cover 1 mile, therefore your truck is traveling more mph than your speedometer thinks. In other words, you speedometer reads slower than you are actually going.

I am running 34″ tires and I havent calibrated my spedometer. I just mentally tell myself that I’m actually going 2-5 mph faster than my speedometer says.

michael bruno
michael bruno
1 year ago

hey i just have a few questions. i have a 15 4runner, i run a 4 inch spindle and a 3 inch spacer in the front then a 3 inch spacer and 2.5 inch lifting spring in the rear, i also run 35s mud graps. i am just wondering how much stress i would be putting on my transmission and rear end towing a 2500 lb boat and trailer around? have been thinking about re-gearing and just dont know what to do just yet, any suggestions are welcome.
thanks mike bruno

brian corey
brian corey
1 year ago

Hi Steve – thanks for the great write up. Curious as to your thoughts on the 4runner with the re-gear and supercharger vs stock 5.7 – I’ve had the crewmax and currently have the sequoia and love the power – is the runner close after the mods?

Thanks

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  brian corey

Hi Brian
I think you’re asking how I think the charged/geared 4R compares to the 5.7 V8? Its a little tough to draw a perfect apples to apples. My rig is pretty heavy, weighted over 7000 lbs on a fully packed down family of 5 trip to Colorado and my daily driving weight I think is around 5200 if I recall. I personally would always prefer a solid V8 motor. The 4R is pretty slow once you start building it out and adding weight. charger and re-gear I feel gets it slightly better than stock even after all the build out. If I were to guess its mabye 15% faster than stock with all the added weight I carry around

Mark
Mark
11 months ago
Reply to  Steve

Isn’t the 4runner’s GVWR 6300lbs? Even with the re-gearing, aren’t you still stressing out the drivetrain?

Brian C
Brian C
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve

Thanks Steve – appreciate your time and thoughts

JOSE
JOSE
2 years ago

Hi there!! I’ve been going back and forth with the idea of regearing my ’01 4runner lately. Maybe you can help me out in my decision making. My truck is lifted roughly 2″ and has slightly larger than stock all-terrain tires, full length roof rack, awning, and other miscellaneous items that add weight. I don’t off-road as often as i’d like but i do plan on adding sliders. I also tow a camper and usually have 5 people and a dog in my truck. Even without towing, driving up hills requires plenty of patience and sometimes prayers lol. My stock gears are 4.10 and I’ve been thinking of making the switch to 4.56. Whats your thoughts on me switching to 4.56? Should i consider 4.30 or 4.88? I think 4.56 would be the ideal gear in my situation. Your input is greatly appreciated!!

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  JOSE

Hi Jose, both 4.56 and 4.88 will be an improvement IMO. I personally stuck with 4.56 because my supercharger is creating quite a bit of power and I didnt want to be over-geared. If you ever plan on going to a 33″ or 34″ tire, I’d go with the 4.88s. If you’re never going to go above 32″-33″ tires, I’d probably stick with 4.56 gears.

Nick
Nick
2 years ago

Hello. Great article. Just curious, I have a 2018 4runner ORP. I have an Icon Stage 2 and run 285/70R17 KO2’s. I’m considering jumping to 285/75/17 KM3 or Ridge Grapplers for height. I don’t have any armor, RTT or extra weight. Do you think that a regear is still something I should do? I don’t think ill be adding any extra weight, at least armor wise. Thanks for the input.

kcSNOWrunner
kcSNOWrunner
2 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Hi Nick,
ok, so basic tires and lift, got it! my kneejerk reaction to your scenario is probably not worth the expense. However digging deeper into it…..I will say it partly depends on how you drive and where you drive. An aggressive driver w/ elevation all around them would probably benefit more from a regear than a conservative driver in say Ohio or Indiana. Regear also produces more mpg benefits in “city” driving rather than “highway” driving (this is due to the shifting or RPMs and torque) …..so overall its one part science and one part relative to your circumstances. Undoubtedly you’ll notice a difference in pick-up and go with a re-gear on 34s. If you do regear, your powertrain will be prepared to add more weight later on. Im not sure if its worth the cost with just a tires and lift. Major major majority of 4runners with 33″-35″ tires and 2-3″ lift are run on stock gears and we all just live with the “slowness” of it. Let us know what you decide!

Nick
Nick
2 years ago
Reply to  kcSNOWrunner

So appreciate the quick response. I live in Oregon and really don’t get off road as much as I would like. Something to think about. I will def research more on this. Thanks and I just found your IG and started following!!!

kcSNOWrunner
kcSNOWrunner
2 years ago
Reply to  Nick

good luck with it all! Take care Nick!

Justin
Justin
2 years ago

I enjoy and I’m thankful for all your write-ups. The big question I can’t find an answer to is – why would one choose 4.56 over 4.88s? As far as extra weight goes, I have an 2018 ORP with 3″ OME BP-51 lift, 33″ BFGs, bumper & winch, full RCI skids and a Gobi rack and I live in Colorado where I don’t do a lot of highway driving, there are a plethora of hills and the 4R is weak up these hills. How would I choose whether I would most benefit from 4.56 or 4.88s?

steve
steve
2 years ago
Reply to  Justin

Hi Justin, Steve (author of the article) here. thanks for the read and comment! in the big big picture both 4.56 and 4.88 gears on a 4Runner running 2-3″ lift and 34″-35″ tires is going to be a significant improvement. The finer details of gearing will vary truck to truck… it depends on lift/drag, weight of vehicle, power output, actual tire size, and as you mentioned perhaps even the type of elevation/terrain you expect to be daily driving.

For me, my 4R is supercharged and will soon be on 34″ AT tires, my truck is putting out about 30% more power than a stock 4R. The analogy I’d like to use two cyclists…one is more powerful than the other but they are both using the same gearset. the more powerful cyclist may not need bigger gears for climbing b/c they put put more power and eventually the larger gear is just spinning inefficiently. that would be considered overgeared. I don’t think there’s much risk of overgearing with 4.88s on a stock 4R. but for me I stuck with 4.56s since I’m supercharged and not ever anticipating running 35 tires.

might be splitting hairs a bit, but either upgrade is still a great upgrade!

Justin
Justin
2 years ago
Reply to  steve

Great perspective, thanks for the reply! I’m about to go all in with 4.88s. I’ll let you know how it feels.

Jakob
Jakob
1 year ago
Reply to  Justin

Hey guys, looking to upgrade myself and debating between 4.56 and 4.88. Similar builds and on 33″. I do tow a 4000lb camper and have that as part of my formula. I do plan on getting a SuperCharger installed as well. Justin, I would love your perspective on gears. My math does not show a considerable difference between the two gears in regards to rpm at 70 mph (2340 rpm vs 2500)

kcSNOWrunner
kcSNOWrunner
2 years ago
Reply to  Justin

sounds good. let us know! you wont regret it!!!

Adrian Wevers
Adrian Wevers
2 years ago

A couple minor things I noticed. The rear Diff you have pictured looks like a Toyota 8 inch diff. Your 2016 should have come with a 8.2. The 8.2 is shim adjusted and your pictured Diff has screw adjusters. The 8.2 is a bit stronger and Toyota went to it because the older 8 inch Diff can’t handle these heavier trucks quite as well. The stock tire on a 2016 is a 32ish tire, going to the ubiquitous 285/70R17 is only a little bigger. Basically it’s like going from a 32 to a 33 inch tire. I don’t tow anything with my 2017, and with the stock 3.73 it seems fine. I know this is probably nit picking a bit, just was wondering more about the different Diff. For the money, I would prefer a supercharger, but that’s just me.

Steve
Steve
2 years ago
Reply to  Adrian Wevers

Hi Adrian! My sales order with ECGS calls for the 8.2” rear diff with eLocker and the 8” front diff. Other than comparing pics on the ECGS website I’m not sure how to tell if it’s the wrong part. mine looks like wats pictured on the ECGS website best I can tell and it installed just fine. Anyhow supercharger is a great option fir the 4R! I have both. I’m also about 1200 lbs heavier than curb weight daily and pushing 2200 lbs heavier than curb weight on camping trips. There was definitely an improvement in drivability and shift points after regear …even on 32.8” tires. Cat Scales are awesome for checking ur weight btw. In the end It just depends on what you think is best fir your set up and needs! Keep in mind the SC is roughly 3x more cost but might be money better spent fir your situation.

Ray
Ray
3 years ago

Since you’ve been driving it for a few months now, how does it drive on local and is there a bigger hit on mpg for local drive?

Great write up and thanks for this! Learning more and more.

kcSNOWrunner
kcSNOWrunner
2 years ago
Reply to  Ray

Hey Ray, sorry i missed this comment forever ago!!! Better late than never. I’ve been regeared for almost a year now and its really great. Offroad the crawl ratio is in a really sweet spot and on road, there is quite a bit more zip off the line (not that anyone’s racing a 4R around town) than stock. MPGs is almost an impossible question to answer b/c all trucks are rigged out so differently, I put on a ton of armor at the same time as the re-gear and after that whole install, i actually lost a fraction of MPG. I was hoping for gains but it didn’t quite pan out that way. I also burn more gas with a supercharger and my curb weight is well over stock. What I can say is months after the regear I added two steel bumpers and the MPGs barely changed. I think that the regear helped prevent the needle from moving down badly after that install. All in all… MPGs suck on a 4R and its a forever losing battle once you get bit with the modification bug. nothing new there. if you do more city driving than highway, you may see some gains along side of no more gear-searching … if you do more highway, you may may see no gains or a slight dip due to spinning higher RPMs. Im super curious how my MPGs will change after going to 34s. I think Im acutely a bit overgeared on 33s w/ the SuperCharger.. so i wonder if i may see some gains once moving to 34 tires. Take care Ray!

sf4Runner
sf4Runner
3 years ago

Thank you for the great article, Steve! Once you’ve re-geared, did you request for a new tune from Magnuson? I recall there was a section in their gForm for gear ratios — not sure if this is a factor in their calibration.

I also have the Magnuson supercharger plus a full rack, sliders, 295/70/17s, and the car is fully sound deadened. The truck is definitely less zippy, re-gearing sounds like a great long-term investment.

Cheers

steve
steve
3 years ago
Reply to  sf4Runner

Thanks sf4Runner. I actually contacted Magnuson back in May 2019 post-install about this very topic. I asked if I needed an updated tune file. This was their reply (copy paste fro their email):

We don’t have nor do we provide custom calibrations. Our calibration for this kit is based on a stock vehicle.

If there are changes made to the stock vehicle (larger gears than stock), there might be issues with vehicle operation.

At this point, I’ve got their SC, 4.56 gears, plenty of added weight that I wonder if there woudl be benefit of a custom Dyno tune. I’m really not sure, but something that I’ve heard talked about on the forums. I havent looked into it, so I cant recommend it. I will say, my truck drives pretty fine. It does shift from 1st to 2nd very very quickly in slower residential and city driving. I’m not sure that’s really an issue though. it may be how it was intended to be from stock all along.

Ironhorse Overland
Ironhorse Overland
3 years ago

Great article, getting ready to add front & rear ARB air lockers and re-gear to 488’s. My girl is getting heavy and am also moving to 315’s in January.

Steve
Steve
1 year ago

nice I hope it worked out well for you!!!

Andrei
3 years ago

Great article! But why bring Lehman into it (whoever he is), when LAYMAN was available? 🙂

Steve
Steve
3 years ago
Reply to  Andrei

haha touche.. we’ll get that typo fixed up asap! …glad you enjoyed the write up and tks!

37
0
Questions or Comments? x
()
x