5th Gen Mods, Accessories, Install

SLAPS – Exterior MOLLE Window Panels: Install & Mounting Options – 5th Gen 4Runner

Updated 3/24/21 / Read Time: 6 mins

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

SLAPs (Side Load Access MOLLE Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

The Side Load Access Panel v2, made by JOE’s Original Equipment, is a fully modular MOLLE mounting system designed to carry your offroading and overlanding gear. The SLAP is essentially an exterior MOLLE panel similar to the popular interior MOLLE panels found in the cargo area. The big difference is that these can be used to mount bigger items such as Rotopax, recovery boards, recovery gear, storage cases, or really anything you’d like.

Each SLAP is made from 3/16” aluminum and is available in either raw aluminum or black powder coat. The top of the SLAP mounts to many of the major aftermarket roof racks, including those produced by Prinsu Design, Front Runner, and Gobi. The bottom of the MOLLE panel uses large suction cups (which also act as shock absorbers) to attach to either the body or the rear side window of the 4Runner.

Please note that the way the panel mounts to the roof rack is different for each of the brands.

This install will cover the steps for mounting the SLAP v2 to the Prinsu Design rack on a 5th or 4th Gen 4Runner, as well as, some of the mounting options we found to work out well.

Find it Online:

Accessories for SLAPs

Tools & Materials

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

What you’ll need for the install:

  • 11mm Socket or Wrench
  • 13mm Socket or Wrench
  • 5/32” Allen/Hex Key
  • Size 30 Torx Bit
  • Electric Drill/Impact

Step 1. Prep Included Hardware

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

The SLAPs v2 includes all of the necessary hardware used for mounting the panel to the roof rack. Each side will require the following:

  • Top plate(long slot) (x1)
  • Main mounting plate (x1)
  • Large carriage bolts (x2)
  • 13mm nuts (x2)
  • Large washers (x2)
  • 5/32 hex head bolts (x6)
  • 11mm Nyloc nuts (x6)
  • Large suction cups (x2)

Note that to mount the top of the panel to the Prinsu Design roof rack, you will use the existing hardware used for the crossbars.

Step 2. Insert Large Carriage Bolts into Top Plate

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

You will need to insert the two carriage bolts into the top plate and secure it using the large washers and the 13mm Nyloc nut. The rounded edge of the carriage bolt will be seen from the top of the plate (the washer and Nyloc nut will be on the backside of the plate).

These are used to stiffen the long slot but could also be used as mounting spots. Use your 13mm wrench or socket and drill to tighten the bolt in the long slot. The recommended placement for the carriage bolts is between the second and third vertical slots from the left and right sides.

Step 3. Attach Top Plate To Large Mounting Plate

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

Now you will be attaching the plate with the long slot to the large mounting plate.

For this, you will need the 6 5/32″ hex head bolts and the 6 11m Nyloc nuts. We used the middle of the three attachment positions available for mounting the top and bottom together. The top panel will go on top of the bottom panel.

Place the 5/32″ bolt through the top panel and tighten both together using the 11mm wrench or socket (the 5/32″ hex head will be exposed with the 11mm Nyloc nut below). Finish attaching the two pieces by tightening all 6 nuts and bolts in place.

Step 4. Insert Suction Cups into Bottom Panel

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

It is extremely easy to attach the suction cups to the bottom panel. Simply place the handle of the suction cup through the large round cutout. Slide both suction cups towards the inside or middle of the plate. This will put both suction cups on the windows when mounting.

Step 5. Clean Rear Side Windows

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

Since we will be mounting the SLAPs to the windows, it is a good idea to clean the area prior to installation. This will also help the suction cups hold onto the window.

Step 6. Remove Existing Prinsu Crossbar Hardware

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

For the Prinsu Design roof rack, depending on your current crossbar setup, you might need to shift some of the crossbars around. For the Gobi and Front Runner, you will have to use either the tubular clamp mount (Gobi) or the provided L-bracket (Front Runner). Remove the stock crossbar hardware using the Torx 30 bit. You will be using this hardware to attach the SLAPs.

Note: The crossbars will move around; use towels or something similar to keep the crossbars in place and prevent them from scratching the roof of the 4Runner.

Step 7. Attach SLAPs To Rack

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

Place the SLAPs on the window and use the suction cups to help brace the panel to where you would like it to be mounted. Line up the crossbars with the top plate of the SLAPs and reattach the stock hardware.

Step 8. Attach Suction Cups

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

Now that the SLAPs have been attached to the rack, firmly put pressure on the suction cups to secure them to the window.

Mounting Options

SLAPS (Side Load Access Panel v2) by JOE’s Original Equipment: Install & Mounting Options For the 4th and 5th Gen 4Runner

For this install, we mounted a 4-Gallon Gasoline Rotopax on the driver side and a protective case for recovery gear on the passenger side.

It is extremely easy to mount recovery gear, such as an axe and shovel using Quick Fist Clamps.

In order to mount a set of traction/recovery boards, you will need to purchase the SLAP Recovery Board Extension Mounts. These extend the width of the SLAP to make it wide enough to mount the boards securely.

Final Thoughts

The SLAP by JOE’s Original Equipment has to be one of the favorite mods done to this 4Runner. Since the owner (IG – @joe.rnr) recently installed a Roofnest Sparrow, he did not have any more room on his Prinsu Design rack for his auxiliary fuel tank. The SLAP is the perfect solution to carry additional gear if your roof rack no longer has the space to accommodate it. With how easy it is to remove the panels, it is extremely easy to make adjustments as to what you want to be mounted to each panel. This install took only about fifteen minutes per side and can easily be done with simple hand tools.

I would highly recommend the SLAP to anyone who is wanting to have easy access to their gear while also giving their 4Runner a more adventure-ready look.

An update on the SLAP will be provided as soon as we are able to put these to the test.

Questions or Comments? Leave them below!

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Kevin Yang
Kevin Yang
13 days ago

Just came across this and they look very good but I’m a little skeptical about the suction. I would like to run x2 Water 2 Gallon Rota Pax for my trips but I’m just worried the suction is not strong enough. When filled they aren’t super light as well. typically I’m going 75-80 on the freeway I’m just afraid the suction will weaken with all that weight and somehow bend the mounts and boom there goes 2 heavy containers flying to the car behind me. They look good but how does the suction hold? Do you have to re-suction them every so often to make sure they are fit snug?

Grant Sutton
Grant Sutton
12 days ago
Reply to  Kevin Yang

Hey Kevin,

We have ran a 4 gallon gas container with no issues at all. The suction cups have not come off on their own even on crazy washboard roads. Having more weight on the panel actually forces more weight onto the suction cup, making it a little stronger. I don”t see the mounting areas bending at all really. Sometimes we do just press on the suction cups out of habit while at the gas station or in between airing up/down.

Keith M
Keith M
16 days ago

Can we get a picture from 30-40 ft away front and side. Its hard to visualize so close.

Raj
Raj
20 days ago

Hi,
This is my 1st post. Here goes: I recently traded my 1998 4Runner for a 2019.
I usually use the handbrake (and now footbrake), as part of my parking routine. Unlike the 1998, the 2019 rolls forward quite a bit after I engage the footbrake. Has anyone else noticed this?

Tom A.
Tom A.
30 days ago

Huh huh. No thanks.

Matt ~M~
Matt ~M~
30 days ago

That looks great, how is the vibration on those suction cups when not loaded?
Is there another brand that you compared too
Thanks

Grant Sutton
Grant Sutton
23 days ago
Reply to  Matt ~M~

No vibrations at all when they were not loaded. The suction cups hold really well. We have not compared this to another brand yet, maybe in the future.

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